slide1marine-rescueport-stephenslogo-only
slide2

Emergency Support to Vessels in Trouble

In a Boating Emergency

CH16 on VHF (Distress & Emergency Channel) • CH88 on 27MHZ 
or CALL 000

Current Weather Info


Shoal Bay Webcam - Live

Port Stephens Weather

Updated every 10 minutes from data collected from our automatic weather station. Refresh the page to update.

Temperatures and rainfall may differ slightly from data collected for the Bureau of Meteorology at Nelson Head due to the different locations of the Stevenson screen and the automatic weather station sensors which are mounted on the radio mast.

MRPS - Facebook Feed

1 day ago
Photos from Marine Rescue Port Stephens's post

Friday, Marine Rescue Port Stephens supported the Shore Bird Count conducted by National Parks and Wildlife Service. Our role was to ferry a number of skilled volunteers whose job it is to count ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
6 days ago
Photos from Marine Rescue Port Stephens's post

Saturday Feb 10 for Marine Rescue Port Stephens is a day which will be long remembered.

The Radio Base logged on in excess of 75 boats - most in the first few hours of the day. That meant the Radio ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
1 week ago
Rafting

Often in Marine Rescue Port Stephens posts we show vessels being rafted (i.e. secured alongside for towing) in preparation for placing at a dock for example. The photos are always from the Rescue ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
2 weeks ago

Saturday morning Marine Rescue Port Stephen's radio base was contacted by a charter vessel which was entering the bay and seeking assistance for a medical emergency with a passenger. Within ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
2 weeks ago
PS31 towing

Today Marine Rescue Port Stephens' PS31 was tasked to assist 3 POB on a 32' vessel 100 metres from Cabbage Tree Island. They had suffered loss of engine oil pressure. A Marine Parks vessel stood ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
3 weeks ago
Photos from Marine Rescue Port Stephens's post

During the afternoon of Australia Day, Marine Rescue Port Stephen's boat crew was tasked to assist a vessel 20 nautical miles off the coast. With 3 adults and 2 teenagers on-baord and being mid ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
3 weeks ago
Photos from Marine Rescue Port Stephens's post

Marine Rescue Port Stephens was proud to be part of the Australia Day celebrations at Fly Point Nelson Bay today. Such a wonderful family day. In the afternoon PS31 was tasked to assist a vessel 20 ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
3 weeks ago
Photos from Marine Rescue Port Stephens's post

Sunday January 21st Marine Rescue Port Stephens supported the RMS collection of expired flares programme. The collection points for Port Stephens were at Hawkes Nest and Little Beach Ramps. Many ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
3 weeks ago
Photos from Marine Rescue Port Stephens's post

On Saturday PS30 from Marine Rescue Port Stephens was tasked to assist a 35' trimaran. The vessel had engine problems and was beached in through some oyster racks.

At high tide PS30 (with its newly ... See more

LIKE
LOVE
HAHA
WOW
SAD
ANGRY
« 1 of 15 »

Other Weather Reports

Willy Weather

Bureau of Meteorology

Hunter Coast Forecast

Fishing Report

Duff's Salamander Bait and Tackleduffs-bait-tackle2-logo

Duff's publish a comprehensive and up-to-date feature on where fish are being caught in and around Port Stephens, giving locations and species of fish.

Salamander Bait and Tackle Fishing Report

 

NEW - What We Do - NEW

We NEED Your Help

PLEASE DONATE

Your support is much appreciated.

THANKYOU


February edition of Port Chatter

2 February 2018

Port Chatter February 2018

Latest News


Darwin man lucky to be rescued after using obsolete beacon

16 November 2017

A Darwin boatie was lucky to be rescued on Tuesday after using an obsolete 121.5 MHz distress beacon no longer detected by satellite.

A man activated his distress beacon after breaking down at sea, however the distress signal went undetected and he was only discovered when a vessel happened to pass by.

distress-beacon-cluster

Image courtesy AMSA

Modern 406MHz beacons replaced 121.5 MHz distress beacons in 2009, when they were phased out. The older style beacons are no longer detected by satellite and can only be detected by nearby aircraft if they happen to be tuned into the frequency.

Australian Maritime Safety Authority Search and Rescue Operations Manager Al Lloyd said people should never rely on an obsolete beacon in an emergency.

“If people are in grave or imminent danger 121.5 beacons are unlikely to result in a search and rescue operation,” Mr Lloyd said. “In this case AMSA and other authorities had no idea that this man was in distress and it’s extremely fortunate a passing boat that lead to a rescue. There could have been a very different outcome.”

The beacons have not been sold in Australia for more than six years. As well as being obsolete they are also likely to have expired batteries which may prevent them from activating at all.

AMSA urges anyone who still owns an old 121.5 MHz beacon to dispose of it appropriately and upgrade to a GPS enabled 406 MHz beacon. The obsolete 121.5 MHz beacons cannot be registered with AMSA.

AMSA Search and Rescue relies on the registration details to gain vital information in the event of an emergency. “If your beacon is registered, you can provide your vehicle or vessel details, your destination, how many people you have with you and nominate emergency contacts,” Mr Lloyd said. “This gives search and rescue officers vital information to assist in any search and rescue operation.

“It can also lead to a faster response and rescue, and prevent unnecessary searches in the event of an accidental activation.”

This is the second incident involving an obsolete 121.5Mhz beacon this week, with another man rescued from a broken down boat in South Australia on Monday.

The man was fortunate a highflying aircraft detected the signal and AMSA was able to send a rescue helicopter to the location near Backstairs Passage off the South Australian coast. The beacon was not detected by satellite.

For more information or to register your beacon for free visit www.amsa.gov.au/beacons


Marine rescue Radio Upgrade Suggestions

1 November 2017

Marine Rescue NSW recommends all boaters carry or install a VHF radio equipped with Digital Selective Calling (DSC) and the Automatic Identification System on board.

VHF radios are relatively inexpensive and offer a clear and powerful signal.

Boaters should always listen on VHF Channel 16 and make their initial calls on Channel 16.

Channel 16 is the international channel for distress, safety and calling because it is constantly monitored, by shore stations and other vessels.

VHF offers the added benefit of Digital Selective Calling, which allows boaters in distress to send a burst of essential data to help rescuers locate them.

A properly installed VHF radio with DSC, once active, will send the vessel’s unique radio identification number known as a Maritime Mobile Service Identity (MMSI). If the VHF radio is connected to GPS the vessel’s latitude and longitude or last known position will be transmitted.

Distress calls can either be general or one of 10 pre-defined designations such as flooding, sinking or man overboard.

A strong feature of the DSC system is that it will continue sending a distress alert every three to four minutes until it is acknowledged by a Coast Station.

MRNSW units have DSC capable radios and DSC forms a major component of the organisation’s expanding VHF network.

Another advantage of VHF is that it supports the Automatic Identification System.

AIS equipped vessels can transmit their position, course and speed via dedicated VHF channels.

AIS data is shown on electronic charts in MRNSW radio bases.

As summer approaches, MRNSW units are conducting a targeted campaign to increase boaters’ general awareness of the safety benefits of VHF marine


Marine Rescue Improves Coastal Radio Network North of Port Stephens

1 November 2017

Work is about to start on a $754,000 project to eliminate marine radio blackspots on the Northern NSW coastline to ensure distress calls from boaters are received swiftly and efficiently.

The first stage involves the installation of new VHF radios, aerials and microwave links on Clarence Peak, south-west of Yamba.

Installation and testing is due to start in October, with the equipment to be transported to the site by four-wheel drive.

A trip to the summit takes about an hour.

This stage of the project will address a blackspot between Iluka-Yamba and Wooli.

Similar marine radio installations are planned for Whoota Lookout, south of Forster; Middle Brother, south of Port Macquarie and Yarrahappini, north-west of South West Rocks.

MRNSW Deputy Commissioner Dean Storey said the project would ultimately save lives on the water.

This major investment in marine radio infrastructure on the North and Mid North coasts will eliminate certain blackspots and enable May Day and Pan Pan calls to be received clearly, he said. In the event of an emergency MRNSW and our water safety partners can mount a rapid search and rescue operation.

He said the project would strengthen the communications network for disseminating emergency warnings and information before, during and after a tsunami, cyclone or storm.

This project follows a comprehensive 2014 marine radio communications review commissioned by MRNSW and funded by a NSW Government grant, he said. We expect to see all projects delivered by the start of the 2018-19 peak summer period.

MRNSW owns maintains and operates the only marine radio network for the State’s boating community. It is used by recreational boaters, small commercial operators, transiting vessels, race fleets and government agencies.